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Player: Kyle Guy

Age: 22

Relevant stats: Guy has played a total of four minutes for the Sacramento Kings this season, but he’s averaged 36.9 minutes per game in 37 appearances for their G League affiliate, the Stockton Kings, this season. Through those 37 games, Guy has averaged 21.5 points per game on 41.4% shooting from the field, including 40% from behind the arc on 9.6 attempts per game. He’s also averaged 4.8 assists, 3.4 rebounds and 1.1 steals per game.

Contract status: Guy, the No. 55 pick in the 2019 NBA Draft, signed a two-way contract with the Kings last summer. The Kings traded back for Guy in last year’s draft.

Recap: Kyle Guy has a jumper that’s as smooth as silk— he made that well-known during his three years at Virginia, where he shot 44.4% from behind the arc on 5.6 3-point attempts per game. That shooting has translated to the G League, where he shot 40% from 3-point range on 355 total 3-point attempts — the fifth-most 3-point attempts in the league. Of any player that attempted at least 300 3-pointers in the G League this season, Guy ranked second in efficiency behind Gabe Vincent (40.3%).

Guy’s a great shooter — we know that. The question is whether or not he can be an elite shooter at the NBA level, and if he can, can he be decent enough on the defensive end to be a net positive for the Kings? If his early returns from the G League hold any weight, the answer is … maybe!

Guy posted a defensive rating of 111.7 with Stockton this season, but he still managed to maintain a net rating of +1.4. With a summer to add weight to his slender frame, that number should improve because most of Guy’s struggles on the defensive end are because of his size. As far as effort and fundamentals go, he’s fine.

Guy’s size is also the reason Ty Ellis challenged him to be the primary ball-handler this season. Standing at a generous 6’2”, Guy’s too short to defend elite wings at any level, so if he’s going to stick in the NBA, he’s going to have to show that he can play some point guard. From a scoring standpoint, Guy should have no problem getting more reps at point guard because he has a tight handle and he can step into his jumper just fine. The bigger question mark is his potential as a playmaker.

Future with Kings: If Guy’s two-way contract is structured like a standard two-way contract, he has a second year he can exercise to stay in Sacramento. If he doesn’t have that option — or he decides not to accept it — he’ll enter restricted free agency, where the Kings will be able to match any offer for him.

The Kings are pretty much set at point guard for the next few years with De’Aaron Fox and Corey Joseph, but Guy would be an interesting option as the team’s third string point guard, a role Yogi Ferrell has struggled in this season. He’d be an especially intriguing option if the Kings’ part ways with their best off-ball shooter, Buddy Hield, in the offseason.

Guy has shown enough to warrant a second look; we’ll see if the Kings give him one.

Grade: B+



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